Anxiety Articles A-Z

Fluoxetine and Premature Ejaculation - Luvox Sexual Side Effects

This page contains links to eMedTV Anxiety Articles containing information on subjects from Fluoxetine and Premature Ejaculation to Luvox Sexual Side Effects. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Fluoxetine and Premature Ejaculation
    Fluoxetine can sometimes be prescribed off-label to treat premature ejaculation. This part of the eMedTV library further explores premature ejaculation and fluoxetine, and explains how the medication works to help delay ejaculation.
  • Fluoxetine Dosing
    If you are first starting depression or OCD treatment with fluoxetine, dosing usually starts at 20 mg. This eMedTV article also provides fluoxetine dosing guidelines for bulimia and panic disorder treatment and explains when and how to take the drug.
  • Fluoxetine HCl
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, fluoxetine hydrochloride (HCl) is used to treat depression and many other conditions. This article gives a brief overview of how the drug works, how to take it, and more.
  • Fluoxetine Side Effects
    Nausea, diarrhea, and anxiety are some of the possible side effects of fluoxetine. This eMedTV page lists other common side effects of the medication, explains which problems require medical attention, and covers rare but serious problems.
  • Fluoxitine
    Fluoxetine is a drug that can be prescribed to treat conditions like depression or OCD. This eMedTV page discusses other fluoxetine uses, lists side effects to look for, and offers dosage information. Fluoxitine is a common misspelling of fluoxetine.
  • Fluoxtine
    Fluoxetine works to treat depression and other conditions by balancing serotonin levels in the brain. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more information. Fluoxtine is a common misspelling of fluoxetine.
  • Fluvoxamin
    People with obsessive-compulsive disorder are often prescribed fluvoxamine. This eMedTV Web page briefly explains how the drug works, provides dosing information, and lists possible side effects. Fluvoxamin is a common misspelling of fluvoxamine.
  • Fluvoxamine
    Fluvoxamine is a prescription medicine licensed for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. This eMedTV article explains how fluvoxamine works, describes some potential side effects, and outlines some tips on when and how to take the drug.
  • Fluvoxamine Dosing
    For treating obsessive-compulsive disorder, the recommended starting fluvoxamine dose is 50 mg once daily. This eMedTV Web page describes some factors that can affect fluvoxamine dosing (such as your age) and lists tips on taking the drug.
  • Fluvoxamine Maleate
    People with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) may benefit from fluvoxamine maleate. This eMedTV selection takes a closer look at this drug, exploring how it works, what to expect during treatment, and how to take it, with a link to learn more.
  • Fluvoximine
    This eMedTV article explains how fluvoxamine works in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. It provides a brief overview of this prescription drug and includes a link to more information. Fluvoximine is a common misspelling of fluvoxamine.
  • Fluvoxomine
    Fluvoxamine is a prescription drug used in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. This eMedTV segment provides a brief overview of the drug and offers a link to more information. Fluvoxomine is a common misspelling of fluvoxamine.
  • Fluxetina
    Fluoxetine (Prozac) is a drug prescribed to treat conditions such as depression and panic disorder. This eMedTV Web page offers a basic overview of the drug and provides a link to more information. Fluxetina is a common misspelling of fluoxetine.
  • Fluxetine
    Besides depression, antidepressants like fluoxetine are also used to treat other conditions. This eMedTV article discusses other fluoxetine uses and lists potential side effects to look out for. Fluxetine is a common misspelling of fluoxetine.
  • Fluxotine
    Fluoxetine, a prescription drug, is used to treat depression, bulimia, and other conditions. This page on the eMedTV site takes a closer look at how this drug works and how often it should be taken. Fluxotine is a common misspelling of fluoxetine.
  • Fobia
    A person with phobia experiences severe anxiety when exposed to certain situations or objects. This eMedTV segment lists various types of phobias and explains the treatments available for these conditions. Fobia is a common misspelling of phobia.
  • GAD
    GAD causes people to worry excessively about things like money or work, even when there is no valid reason. This eMedTV segment offers detailed facts on the disorder, including information on symptoms, causes, and treatment options.
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder
    Generalized anxiety disorder causes people to feel constant, severe anxiety, often without a reason. This eMedTV Web page offers more facts on the condition, including the symptoms, causes, and treatment options.
  • Generic Anafranil
    This eMedTV page explains that generic Anafranil is currently available in three different strengths. This page also covers how the FDA assigned generic Anafranil an "AB" rating, meaning generic Anafranil is equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Ativan
    As explained in this eMedTV article, generic Ativan is made by several companies and is available in different strengths. This resource offers an more information on this topic, including a description of the FDA's testing system for generics.
  • Generic BuSpar
    Generic BuSpar tablets, which are available in four strengths, are manufactured by several companies. This eMedTV resource describes the medication in more detail, including information on its uses and the various manufacturers.
  • Generic Compazine
    Compazine tablets and suppositories are both available in generic form. This part of the eMedTV library explains which companies manufacture Compazine generics and lists the various strengths available for generic Compazine.
  • Generic Fluoxetine
    Fluoxetine is currently available in generic form. As this eMedTV Web page explains, generic fluoxetine comes in capsule, tablet, and liquid form. Several companies make the generic products, including Teva Pharmaceuticals and Sandoz Pharmaceuticals.
  • Generic Limbitrol
    Limbitrol is currently available in generic form. This section of the eMedTV library describes generic Limbitrol tablets in more detail, lists the various strengths available, and explains whether they are equivalent to the brand-name version.
  • Generic Luvox
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic Luvox is manufactured by more than 10 different companies (including Watson Laboratories and Teva Pharmaceuticals). This article also lists the available strengths of generic Luvox (25 mg, 50 mg, and 100 mg).
  • Generic Luvox CR
    As you'll see in this part of the eMedTV site, Luvox CR (fluvoxamine CR) is now available in generic form. This article takes a closer look, with information on how it compares to the brand-name drug, available strengths, and more.
  • Generic Niravam
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Niravam (orally disintegrating alprazolam). This eMedTV page discusses when a generic Niravam might become available and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Paxil
    This eMedTV segment explains that generic Paxil is currently available in several strengths. This Web page also points out that generic medications must undergo certain tests to compare them to brand-name drugs, and generic Paxil is no exception.
  • Generic Sarafem
    There are two strengths of generic Sarafem that are currently available. This segment from the eMedTV Web site offers an overview of generic Sarafem, including information on its strengths, forms, and manufacturers.
  • Generic Serax
    The prescription medicine Serax is available in generic form. As this eMedTV article explains, generic Serax is available in three strengths (10 mg, 15 mg, and 30 mg) and is made by several manufacturers (including Ivax Pharmaceuticals).
  • Generic Valium
    This eMedTV Web page provides an overview of generic Valium, which comes in tablet, oral liquid, and injectable forms and is manufactured by several companies (including Roxane Laboratories and Watson Pharmaceuticals).
  • Generic Xanax
    Xanax is currently available in generic form. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes generic Xanax in more detail, including a list of the various strengths available and the drug companies that currently manufacture it.
  • Get Outside
    In our busy, high-tech lives, we can go days, weeks, or even entire seasons without connecting with nature. A short walk, a few minutes of yardwork, or simply finding a quiet spot to sit outdoors can help reduce stress quite a bit. You don't need to commit to hours and hours of such activities -- just a few minutes will do -- and don't let weather get in your way. Just dress for the weather and enjoy the variety of a downpour, a light snow, a bright sunny day, and a crisp fall morning.
  • How Does Ativan Work?
    As this eMedTV page explains, Ativan works to treat conditions such as anxiety and seizures by affecting certain nerve signals in the brain. This page further discusses how Ativan affects the body, such as by relaxing muscles and causing sleepiness.
  • How Does Clonazepam Work?
    This eMedTV article answers the question "How does clonazepam work?" As this resource explains, the drug works by enhancing the effects of GABA, a naturally calming brain chemical that can slow down or stop certain nerve signals in the brain.
  • How Does Paxil Work?
    Many people wonder, "How does Paxil work?" As this article from the eMedTV Web site explains, Paxil works by balancing the levels of a chemical in the brain (serotonin). Depression and other conditions can occur when serotonin levels are unbalanced.
  • How Does Valium Work?
    This eMedTV article answers the question, "How does Valium work?" Valium is a type of benzodiazepine medication that works by enhancing the effects of a certain naturally calming chemical in the brain (known as gamma-aminobutyric acid).
  • How Does Xanax Work?
    As this eMedTV page explains, Xanax works to treat conditions such as anxiety and panic disorder by affecting certain nerve signals in the brain. This page further discusses how Xanax affects the body, such as by relaxing muscles and causing sleepiness.
  • How to Cope With Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
    Many people don't know how to cope with post-traumatic stress disorder. The coping skills in this eMedTV article can be vital in overcoming the illness. This page offers many tips and suggestions, including negative actions that can make PTSD worse.
  • Info on Axiety
    As this eMedTV page explains, anxiety disorders can cause panic attacks, nightmares, obsessive thoughts, and other symptoms. This page lists anxiety disorder types, symptoms, and treatment options. Info on axiety is a common misspelling of anxiety.
  • Information About OCD
    People with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are often plagued with persistent, unwelcome thoughts. This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at OCD, with information about treatment options, symptoms, and more.
  • Information on Anxiety
    When a person has an anxiety disorder, their symptoms are chronic and can grow progressively worse. This eMedTV article gives an overview of this condition, with information on possible symptoms, causes, treatment options, and more.
  • Information on Efexor XL
    This page on the eMedTV site describes Effexor XR, a prescription drug licensed to treat depression and anxiety disorders, and provides a link to more detailed information. Information on Efexor XL is a common variation and misspelling of Effexor XR.
  • Is Xanax Safe During Pregnancy
    You may be wondering, "Is it safe to take Xanax during pregnancy?" As this section of the eMedTV Web site explains, Xanax is generally considered to be unsafe for pregnant women. Studies have shown that the drug can increase the risk of birth defects.
  • Just Say No
    If your life is too full, don't feel bad about saying no to requests for your time. No matter how hard we try, it can be extremely difficult to reduce stress if our lives are too busy. Do yourself a favor and set yourself up for a lower-stress week by saying no when you can.
  • Kava Kava
    Kava kava is an herbal supplement most commonly used for treating anxiety. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses other possible uses of kava kava, explores the effectiveness of this supplement, and explains whether it is safe to use.
  • Kava Kava Benefits
    Kava kava is often claimed to be useful for treating depression, anxiety, and insomnia. This article from the eMedTV library discusses other potential kava kava benefits and explores the effectiveness and safety of this dietary supplement.
  • Kava Kava Dosing
    At this time, a safe and effective kava kava dosage has not been established. This section of the eMedTV archives discusses reasonable kava kava dosing and explores some of the risks involved with taking this dietary supplement.
  • Kava Kava Herb Information
    This part of the eMedTV site gives a quick overview of kava kava, an herbal supplement claimed to help with anxiety and other conditions. Information on side effects is provided, as is a link to more details.
  • Kavakava
    Kava kava is a dietary supplement used for treating numerous conditions, including anxiety. This eMedTV article briefly covers kava kava uses and links to more details about the safety of the supplement. Kavakava is a common misspelling of kava kava.
  • Klonazepam
    A prescription drug, clonazepam is used to treat epileptic seizures and panic disorder. This eMedTV selection briefly describes the drug and provides a link to more in-depth information. Klonazepam is a common misspelling of clonazepam.
  • Limbitrol
    Limbitrol is a medication that is prescribed for treating depression associated with anxiety. This eMedTV Web page describes the effects of Limbitrol, offers general dosing information for the drug, and explains how it works to treat depression.
  • Limbitrol Addiction
    As with all drugs, it is possible to become addicted to Limbitrol. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Limbitrol addiction, describes the potential risks of becoming addicted, and offers suggestions for dealing with an addiction.
  • Limbitrol and Alcohol
    It is potentially dangerous to combine Limbitrol and alcohol. As this eMedTV Web page explains, since both are CNS depressants and can slow down brain activity, combining the two can lead to potentially serious side effects or complications.
  • Limbitrol and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding while taking Limbitrol may cause serious problems in a nursing infant. This eMedTV article further discusses Limbitrol and breastfeeding, and describes the potential problems that may occur when the drug is passed through breast milk.
  • Limbitrol and Dry Mouth
    Dry mouth is one of the more commonly reported Limbitrol side effects. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on Limbitrol and dry mouth, lists suggestions that may provide relief, and explains what treatments your doctor may recommend.
  • Limbitrol and Pregnancy
    Research shows that it may be dangerous for pregnant women to use Limbitrol. This eMedTV Web page discusses the results of studies on Limbitrol and pregnancy in more detail and explains the possible risks of using the drug while pregnant.
  • Limbitrol Dosage
    Most people start with a Limbitrol dosage of three to four tablets each day. This article from the eMedTV archives covers Limbitrol dosing guidelines in more detail and includes tips and precautions for those taking the medication.
  • Limbitrol Drug Information
    This eMedTV resource provides some basic information on Limbitrol, a drug approved to treat depression associated with anxiety. This article looks at dosing guidelines and safety warnings, and provides a link to more details on this product.
  • Limbitrol Drug Interactions
    Drugs that may cause negative interactions with Limbitrol include barbiturates, cimetidine, and narcotics. This eMedTV article lists other medicines that may lead to Limbitrol drug interactions and explains what can occur as a result.
  • Limbitrol Overdose
    If you take too much Limbitrol, overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, vomiting, and fever. This eMedTV segment describes other potential effects of a Limbitrol overdose and explains what treatments your healthcare provider may recommend.
  • Limbitrol Side Effects
    Common Limbitrol side effects may include blurred vision, dry mouth, and dizziness. This eMedTV segment also lists less common problems and describes potentially serious side effects of Limbitrol that should be reported to a doctor right away.
  • Limbitrol Uses
    Limbitrol is used for the treatment of depression that is associated with anxiety. This eMedTV resource further explores how the drug works, discusses Limbitrol uses in children, as well as off-label uses, and describes the effects of the medication.
  • Limbitrol Warnings and Precautions
    Limbitrol can cause severe drowsiness and difficulty breathing, which may be life threatening. This eMedTV page offers other Limbitrol warnings and precautions, including a list of potential side effects or complications that may occur with the drug.
  • Liquid Paxil
    A doctor may prescribe Paxil liquid or tablets to treat depression, OCD, or other brain conditions. This eMedTV Web article discusses how Paxil works, describes potential side effects, and lists the various strengths of the drug that are available.
  • Luvox
    Luvox is a prescription medicine that is used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This eMedTV article explains how Luvox affects a certain chemical in the brain, highlights potential side effects, and offers tips on taking the medication.
  • Luvox and Breastfeeding
    Luvox has been shown to pass through breast milk to nursing babies. This eMedTV page discusses Luvox and breastfeeding in more detail, explaining that the benefits of taking Luvox often outweigh the possible risks to the nursing baby.
  • Luvox and Dry Mouth
    Some people who take Luvox may develop a dry mouth. This eMedTV Web page explains that if you are taking Luvox and dry mouth occurs, there are some things that you can do, such as sipping water or sugarless drinks often and avoiding drinks with caffeine.
  • Luvox and Insomnia
    Insomnia appears to be one of the more common side effects of Luvox. This eMedTV article examines Luvox and insomnia, explaining some of the symptoms of insomnia and highlighting some tips on how to improve your sleep habits.
  • Luvox and Pregnancy
    In animal studies involving Luvox and pregnancy, the drug did appear to cause harm to fetuses. This eMedTV Web page explains that a doctor may prescribe Luvox to a pregnant woman if its benefits outweigh the possible risks to her unborn child.
  • Luvox and Suicide
    This eMedTV page explains that it's hard to tell for sure if there is a link between Luvox and suicides or suicidal behavior. This page also lists signs of suicidal behavior to report to your doctor (such as aggressive, angry, or violent behavior).
  • Luvox CR
    Luvox CR is a prescription medicine used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder. This eMedTV Web page explains how the drug works, offers dosing information, and lists potential side effects that may occur.
  • Luvox CR and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Luvox CR (fluvoxamine CR) recommends that breastfeeding women avoid using the drug. This eMedTV segment provides more information on Luvox CR and breastfeeding, and explores the possible risks of using the drug while nursing.
  • Luvox CR and Insomnia
    Insomnia is one of the most common side effects reported with Luvox CR (fluvoxamine CR). This article from the eMedTV library explores the link between Luvox CR and insomnia in more detail and offers some helpful tips for better sleep.
  • Luvox CR and Pregnancy
    At this time, the full risks of using Luvox CR (fluvoxamine CR) during pregnancy are not known. This eMedTV page offers a more in-depth look at Luvox CR and pregnancy, and lists the problems that were seen when the drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Luvox CR and Suicide
    As this eMedTV segment explains, antidepressants such as Luvox CR may increase the risk of suicidal behavior in children and teenagers. This article includes the results of clinical studies on this topic and takes a look at signs of suicidal behavior.
  • Luvox CR Dosage
    For most people, the recommended starting dose of Luvox CR is 100 mg, taken once daily at bedtime. This eMedTV Web page explains how Luvox CR dosing is increased gradually over time and offers tips for those taking this prescription medication.
  • Luvox CR Interactions
    Triptans, NSAIDs, and aspirin may interact with Luvox CR. Interactions such as these, as this eMedTV page explains, could increase your risk of developing serious side effects, such as stomach bleeding, fever, muscle spasms, or a dangerous arrhythmia.
  • Luvox CR Medication Information
    This eMedTV page provides some basic information on Luvox CR, a medication used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder. It explains how often this drug is taken, how it performed in clinical trials, and what to tell your doctor before taking it.
  • Luvox CR Overdose
    Common Luvox CR (fluvoxamine CR) overdose symptoms include nausea, breathing problems, and drowsiness. This eMedTV page also lists some of the more serious overdose symptoms that may occur and describes treatment options for a Luvox CR overdose.
  • Luvox CR Sexual Side Effects
    When using Luvox CR (fluvoxamine CR), sexual side effects could potentially occur. As this eMedTV resource explains, Luvox CR sexual side effects may include decreased sex drive or orgasm problems, ejaculation problems, and priapism.
  • Luvox CR Side Effects
    Common Luvox CR side effects may include diarrhea, dry mouth, and drowsiness. This segment from the eMedTV library also lists less common but potentially serious side effects of Luvox CR that require medical attention, such as chest pain.
  • Luvox CR Uses
    Luvox CR is approved for treating obsessive-compulsive disorder. This eMedTV article also lists common off-label uses for Luvox CR, explains how the medicine works, and discusses its use in children.
  • Luvox CR Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Luvox CR if you have taken an MAOI in the past two weeks. This eMedTV article further explains who should not use Luvox CR. Warnings and precautions on what side effects to look out for during treatment are also included.
  • Luvox Dosage
    This eMedTV Web page explains that the recommended starting Luvox dosage for people with obsessive-compulsive disorder is 50 mg once a day. The maximum Luvox dose is 300 mg once daily. This page also lists factors that can affect Luvox dosages.
  • Luvox Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page lists some of the drugs that can potentially interact with Luvox (including NSAIDs, lithium, and mexiletine) and explains how Luvox drug interactions can alter the levels of some drugs in your blood and raise your risk of side effects.
  • Luvox for OCD
    As this eMedTV article explains, doctors prescribe Luvox for OCD because of its effect on a certain chemical within the brain. This page addresses this in more detail, with info on who can take this drug and possible off-label uses.
  • Luvox Overdose
    It is possible to take too much Luvox. This portion of the eMedTV library describes some of the symptoms of a Luvox overdose, such as vomiting and breathing problems. This page also outlines some treatment options for a recent overdose.
  • Luvox Sexual Side Effects
    This portion of the eMedTV library explains that there are possible Luvox sexual side effects, such as changes in sex drive, priapism, and erectile dysfunction. This page also covers some treatment options your healthcare provider may recommend.
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