Anxiety Articles A-Z

Sarafem and Suicide - Social Phobia

This page contains links to eMedTV Anxiety Articles containing information on subjects from Sarafem and Suicide to Social Phobia. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Sarafem and Suicide
    It's difficult to tell if there's a link between antidepressants (such as Sarafem) and suicide. This eMedTV page lists some signs of suicidal behavior that you should report to your doctor immediately (such as thoughts of death or violent behavior).
  • Sarafem and Weight Gain
    Weight gain appears to be one of the common side effects of Sarafem. This eMedTV article also discusses the results of clinical studies done on Sarafem and weight gain, and explains what to do if you notice weight gain while taking Sarafem.
  • Sarafem and Weight Loss
    Weight loss is a possible side effect of Sarafem. As this eMedTV Web page explains, the link between Sarafem and weight loss is unclear, but it is known that the drug causes a loss of appetite and nausea (which may contribute to weight loss).
  • Sarafem Dosage
    The suggested starting Sarafem dosage for treating PMDD is 20 mg once daily. This portion of the eMedTV archives also explains the different options for taking Sarafem and offers some suggestions for when and how to take the medication.
  • Sarafem Drug Interactions
    When aspirin, lithium, digoxin, or certain other drugs are taken with Sarafem, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV segment lists other drugs that can cause Sarafem interactions and describes the risks associated with combining these medicines.
  • Sarafem for PMDD
    If you have premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), you may benefit from Sarafem. This eMedTV Web page gives a brief overview of how this drug performed in clinical trials and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Sarafem Overdose
    People who take too much Sarafem may experience nausea, drowsiness, or vomiting, among other symptoms. This eMedTV Web page lists other symptoms of a Sarafem overdose and highlights some of the treatment options for an overdose.
  • Sarafem Sexual Side Effects
    For those taking Sarafem, sexual side effects are a possibility. This eMedTV Web page explains that a decreased sex drive is one of the side effects of Sarafem and discusses what to do if you develop sexual side effects while taking Sarafem.
  • Sarafem Side Effects
    Headache, nausea, and runny nose are some of the side effects that can occur while taking Sarafem. This eMedTV page lists common Sarafem side effects, as well as serious problems (like hallucinations) that require immediate medical attention.
  • Sarafem Uses
    Sarafem is used to treat premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in women age 18 and older. This eMedTV resource outlines the symptoms of PMDD and explains how Sarafem works to alleviate these symptoms. There are currently no off-label Sarafem uses.
  • Sarafem Warnings and Precautions
    Sarafem may cause seizures or bleeding in the stomach. This eMedTV page contains other Sarafem warnings and precautions, including a list of possible side effects that may occur and information on who should not take the medicine.
  • Saraphim
    Sarafem is a prescription drug licensed to treat premenstrual dysphoric disorder. This eMedTV segment briefly describes Sarafem, explains how it works, and links to more information about the drug. Saraphim is a common misspelling of Sarafem.
  • Sarex
    Serax is a prescription drug licensed for the treatment of anxiety and alcohol withdrawal. This eMedTV article describes how Serax works, explains how often it is taken, and lists its potential side effects. Sarex is a common misspelling of Serax.
  • Sarifem
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Sarafem to treat premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). This eMedTV Web page explores some potential side effects of Sarafem and offers general dosing information. Sarifem is a common misspelling of Sarafem.
  • Sarix
    Serax is a prescription medicine often used for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal or anxiety. This eMedTV page describes the effects of Serax and lists potential side effects that may occur during treatment. Sarix is a common misspelling of Serax.
  • Sarofim
    Sarafem is a prescription medication commonly used to treat premenstrual dysphoric disorder. This eMedTV page describes the effects of this drug and lists potential side effects that may occur. Sarofim is a common misspelling of Sarafem.
  • See Your Doctor
    If you seem to get stressed out too easily, or if you always respond poorly to stress, considering talking to your healthcare provider about it. Sometimes the perception of excess stress or feelings of stress in situations that are normally not stressful could be symptoms of an anxiety disorder.
  • Serafem
    This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of Sarafem, a drug used to treat premenstrual dysphoric disorder. This page describes how the medication works and links to more information. Serafem is a common misspelling of Sarafem.
  • Serafim
    Sarafem is a prescription drug used for treating premenstrual dysphoric disorder. This eMedTV resource describes how Sarafem works and lists some of the side effects that may occur during treatment. Serafim is a common misspelling of Sarafem.
  • Serax
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Serax to treat anxiety or alcohol withdrawal. This eMedTV page provides an overview of this medication, including information about its effects, dosing guidelines, and available strengths.
  • Serax Dosage
    The recommended Serax dosage for mild-to-moderate anxiety is 10 mg to 15 mg three or four times daily. This eMedTV page also covers Serax dosing for those with severe anxiety or anxiety associated with depression, as well as tips on taking the drug.
  • Serax Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV page explains, Serax drug interactions can occur when the medicine is taken along with anesthetics, opiates, and certain other drugs. This page describes how these interactions can increase your risk of side effects and other problems.
  • Serax Medication Information
    If you have anxiety, your healthcare provider may recommend Serax. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of Serax, with information on what else the medication can be used for and what your healthcare provider needs to know.
  • Serax Side Effects
    Headaches, dizziness, and a spinning sensation (vertigo) are among the more common side effects of Serax. This eMedTV article also lists some less common Serax side effects (like nausea or tremors) and serious side effects to report to your doctor.
  • Serax Uses
    For the most part, Serax is used for treating alcohol withdrawal and anxiety. However, as this eMedTV resource explains, Serax may also be used "off-label" to treat insomnia. This article also covers Serax uses in children.
  • Serax Warnings and Precautions
    You shouldn't take Serax if you are allergic to any component used to make the drug. This eMedTV page covers other Serax warnings and precautions, such as the safety of taking the drug while pregnant or breastfeeding and people who shouldn't take it.
  • Serex
    Serax is a drug commonly prescribed to people who have anxiety or are experiencing alcohol withdrawal. This eMedTV Web page explores the effects of Serax and explains how often this drug is generally taken. Serex is a common misspelling of Serax.
  • Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors
    As this eMedTV page explains, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are used to treat depression and many other conditions, such as panic disorder. This article offers a brief overview of SNRIs and includes a link to more information.
  • Serrex
    Serax, a prescription medicine, is used for treating anxiety and alcohol withdrawal. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at Serax and its effects, dosing information, and possible side effects. Serrex is a common misspelling of Serax.
  • Sertralin
    Sertraline is a prescription drug licensed to treat depression and other conditions affecting the brain. This eMedTV resource lists some of these other conditions and explains how the medication works. Sertralin is a common misspelling of sertraline.
  • Sertraline
    Sertraline is a prescription drug that is often used to treat depression, panic disorders, and OCD. This eMedTV resource explains how sertraline works, discusses conditions it is used to treat, and provides tips for how and when to take the drug.
  • Sertraline Dosing
    Sertraline dosing for panic disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder usually starts at 25 mg once daily. This eMedTV Web page discusses sertraline dosing for depression, social anxiety disorder, and other conditions.
  • Sertraline Hydrochloride
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, sertraline hydrochloride is a medication used to treat depression and other conditions. This Web page gives a basic overview of this drug, with information on how it is taken and what else it can be used for.
  • Sertraline Overdose
    A sertraline overdose may cause drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, and more serious symptoms. This eMedTV article describes other symptoms that may occur when a person overdoses on sertraline and discusses treatment of such an overdose.
  • Sertraline Uses
    When it comes to sertraline, uses of the drug may include treating depression and anxiety disorders. This eMedTV segment discusses uses of sertraline, such as the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and other conditions.
  • Sexual Side Effects From Effexor XR
    This eMedTV resource describes potential sexual side effects from Effexor XR that may occur, such as impotence, a decreased sex drive, or orgasm problems. This page also explains what to do if you have sexual side effects while taking Effexor XR.
  • Side Effects of Alprazolam XR
    Side effects of alprazolam XR can include memory problems, nausea, and drowsiness. This eMedTV resource discusses these and other side effects seen with the drug, including those that should be reported immediately to a healthcare provider.
  • Side Effects of Chlordiazepoxide
    Drowsiness, confusion, and coordination problems are among the more common side effects of chlordiazepoxide. This eMedTV Web page offers an in-depth look at the side effects of chlordiazepoxide, including those that may require immediate medical care.
  • Side Effects of Clorazepate
    This eMedTV resource provides lists of both common and rare side effects of clorazepate that have been reported. It also provides a list of side effects that, while rare, are potentially serious and may require prompt medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Escitalopram
    Side effects of escitalopram may include nausea, fatigue, and dry mouth. This part of the eMedTV site also lists rare escitalopram side effects (such as high blood sugar) and side effects to report to your doctor (such as chest palpitations).
  • Side Effects of Fluvoxamine
    Common side effects of fluvoxamine may include nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness. This eMedTV segment discusses the common side effects of fluvoxamine in more detail and also outlines the side effects that you should report to your doctor.
  • Learn About Side Effects of Kava Kava
    Potential side effects of kava kava include dizziness, upset stomach, and red eyes. This eMedTV resource lists other possible side effects that may occur, including potentially serious side effects that should be reported to your doctor immediately.
  • Side Effects of Paroxetine Controlled Release
    Headaches, nausea, and insomnia are a few common paroxetine controlled release side effects. This eMedTV article lists other common side effects, as well as serious problems that require medical attention and rare but possible side effects.
  • Side Effects of Sertraline
    Common side effects seen with sertraline include diarrhea, nausea, insomnia, and fatigue. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at additional reactions some people have to this medication, including potentially serious ones, such as suicidal thoughts.
  • Side Effects of Trifluoperazine
    Sexual problems and dizziness are among the common side effects of trifluoperazine. This eMedTV resource lists other side effects seen with the drug, including serious side effects that you should report to your healthcare provider right away.
  • SNRI Side Effects
    Common SNRI side effects may include drowsiness, insomnia, and nausea. Besides common side effects, this eMedTV segment also lists serious side effects of SNRIs that require medical attention, such as hallucinations, panic attacks, or fast heart rate.
  • SNRI Uses
    SNRI antidepressants are used for treating depression, social phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder. As this eMedTV article explains, there are also a number of "off-label" SNRI uses, including the treatment of obesity, chronic pain, or migraines.
  • SNRI Withdrawal
    Common SNRI withdrawal symptoms may include nausea, irritability, and dizziness. As this eMedTV Web page explains, a drug withdrawal can usually be prevented by stopping the medication gradually instead of abruptly.
  • SNRIs
    SNRI antidepressants are used for treating conditions like depression, panic disorder, and social phobia. This eMedTV resource lists the various SNRIs available, explains how the drugs work, and describes possible side effects that may occur.
  • SNRIs and Breastfeeding
    If you are taking SNRIs and breastfeeding, make sure you're aware of the risks. As this eMedTV page explains, SNRIs pass through breast milk in fairly high levels, so doctors may need to monitor breastfed babies (who are exposed to the drugs) closely.
  • SNRIs and Pregnancy
    Using SNRIs during pregnancy may cause harm to the fetus. As this eMedTV page explains, studies on SNRIs and pregnancy show that the drugs caused tremors, seizures, and irritability in newborns who were exposed to SNRIs during pregnancy.
  • SNRIs and Suicide
    People taking SNRIs may be at an increased risk for suicidal thoughts. This eMedTV article discusses SNRIs and suicide in more detail, lists possible signs of suicidal behavior, and explains who may be at higher risk for developing suicidal thoughts.
  • Social Anxiety Disorder
    Social anxiety disorder is characterized by an overwhelming sense of insecurity in social settings. This eMedTV article covers the different types of social anxiety disorders, along with symptoms that may occur and available treatment options.
  • Social Phobia
    Social phobia is defined as a persistent, chronic fear of being judged by others in a social setting. As this eMedTV resource explains, the condition can interfere with work or school; however, it can be treated successfully with medication and therapy.
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